Final Friday Guest Post: Stephen Brewster

May 31, 2013 | Get free updates of new posts here

I’ve already had Phil Cooke and Daniel Bashta share really great posts as part of our Final Friday series and now I’m pumped to bring you another great one from Stephen Brewster, Creative Arts Pastor at Cross Point Church in Nashville, TN. You can find him online at stephenbrewster.me and @b_rewster

Stephen Brewster

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stephen Brewster has worked in creative environments for over 12 years. From artist development, marketing, and management in the music business to creative team leading and artistic direction, Stephen has worked with a vast array of artists. Leveraging creativity and leadership, it is Stephens desire for the church to regain its position as a leader of the creative frontier. Stephen currently serves as Creative Arts pastor at Cross Point church in Nashville, TN where he lives with his wife, Jackie and 4 amazing kids. If you would like to follow Stephen on twitter he can be found at: @B_rewster or on his daily blog about creativity http://www.StephenBrewster.me

shoes graphic

 

“Walk a mile in their shoes”

 

It was not until I started leading creative artists I really understood this concept. I mean, I heard it a million times, but as an artist why would I ever need to understand the perspective of someone else?

 

As artists we daily face the temptation to slip into a really dangerous place. It is a place where, when dealing with the rejection of something we have made, we start to create voices for the people who turned down our stuff.

 

“They don’t understand me…”

“They don’t really want to support what I do…”

“They don’t want the best for me…”

“If only they understood…”

“They don’t want to be relevant….”

“I thought I was here to stretch the status quo…”

 

And on and on we go, spiraling into a very dark world cluttered with doubt, questions, insecurity and fear.

 

The truth is, VERY RARELY are these voices real, let alone accurate, but we are quick to assign these condemning, negative, creativity killing voices to our bosses, friends, spouses and loved ones.

 

But what if we actually did take a minute, took off our shoes, and tried to understand “the other side”.

 

What if we knew all of the other circumstances around these decisions? What if we had the guts to trust the decision makers God put in our lives are not crazy, but they are actually making prayerful decisions to help steward momentum and energy. What if we had the audacity to believe the people around us may actually care about us enough to be honest with us because they want the absolute best for us?

 

So today, I have a challenge for you. Take a minute and revisit a recent rejection. Maybe it was a song you wrote, a worship set you created, a design element or video edit you were asked to change…review how you responded. Did you extend the same grace you would want extended to you?

 

I am not asking you to stop being emotional. The very emotion that makes you feel is the same emotion that makes you great…but what if we decided to believe the best? It might just change everything, because at the end of the day, we need you. We need your art, your instincts, your innovation…we need your voice and your prophetic creativity, the creativity that speaks to the future, to propel us to a place where God is able to change lives…and that might just start with ours, today.

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3 Comments

  • Reply Final Friday Guest Post: Stephen Brewster | Church Leaders May 31, 2013 at 11:28 am

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  • Reply Final Friday Guest Post: Stephen Brewster | Media Ministry May 31, 2013 at 11:31 am

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  • Reply Jameson Reynolds June 5, 2013 at 2:44 pm

    Great insight @b_rewster! This is something I often struggle with. It’s hard to not feel a sense of rejection when your ideas or creativity are rejected or asked to be altered. I have to do better trusting that God put me under the leadership I submit to, and that they have my best interest in my mind.

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